Faculty Talks

  • 14:46

    The Porous Cube

    The Porous Cube

    Christina Olsen, Class of '56 Director of the Williams College Museum of Art, talks about museums in the 21st century in the Daring Change session "How Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
    Christina Olsen, Class of '56 Director of the Williams College Museum of Art, talks about museums in the 21st century in the Daring Change session "How Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
  • 57:34

    Derivative vs. Integral: Final Smackdown!

    Derivative vs. Integral: Final Smackdown!

    A (very) humorous debate between Colin Adams, Thomas T. Reed Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, and his colleague Tom Garrity, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Mathematics, moderated by Williams president Adam Falk. October 29, 2011
    A (very) humorous debate between Colin Adams, Thomas T. Reed Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, and his colleague Tom Garrity, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Mathematics, moderated by Williams president Adam Falk. October 29, 2011
  • 22:35

    Boulder Thoughts: Decoding the World through Geoscience

    Boulder Thoughts: Decoding the World through Geoscience

    Ronadh Cox, professor of geosciences and chair of the Maritime Studies Program, presents "Boulder Thoughts: Decoding the World through Geoscience." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Ronadh Cox, professor of geosciences and chair of the Maritime Studies Program, presents "Boulder Thoughts: Decoding the World through Geoscience." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 16:23

    The Decline of Disciplines and the Renaissance Revival

    The Decline of Disciplines and the Renaissance Revival

    Satyan Devadoss, associate professor of mathematics, discusses one possible future for the Williams course catalog in the Daring Change session "How Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
    Satyan Devadoss, associate professor of mathematics, discusses one possible future for the Williams course catalog in the Daring Change session "How Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
  • 1:0:09

    James McAllister: "Why Obama Will Decisively Win"

    James McAllister: "Why Obama Will Decisively Win"

    "Why Obama will decisively win the presidential election," a talk by Professor of Political Science James McAllister. Given at the Faculty Club on the Williams College campus on Oct. 1, 2012
    "Why Obama will decisively win the presidential election," a talk by Professor of Political Science James McAllister. Given at the Faculty Club on the Williams College campus on Oct. 1, 2012
  • 21:10

    The Percheron in the Tunnel

    The Percheron in the Tunnel

    Jim Shepard, the J. Leland Miller Professor of American History, Literature, and Eloquence, presents "The Percheron in the Tunnel." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series
    Jim Shepard, the J. Leland Miller Professor of American History, Literature, and Eloquence, presents "The Percheron in the Tunnel." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series
  • 19:10

    In Search of the Center

    In Search of the Center

    Justin Crowe '03, assistant professor of political science at Williams College, presents "In Search of the Center." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Justin Crowe '03, assistant professor of political science at Williams College, presents "In Search of the Center." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 22:01

    Designing Nanoarchitecture

    Designing Nanoarchitecture

    Lee Park, professor of chemistry at Williams College, presents "Designing Nanoarchitecture." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Lee Park, professor of chemistry at Williams College, presents "Designing Nanoarchitecture." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 19:57

    Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises

    Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises

    Gerard Caprio Jr. '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics at Williams, presents "Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises." Delivered June 9, 2012 as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Gerard Caprio Jr. '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics at Williams, presents "Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises." Delivered June 9, 2012 as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 17:41

    Embracing Conflict and Change

    Embracing Conflict and Change

    Leslie Brown, associate professor of history, recommends embracing conflict to affect change in the Daring Change session "What Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
    Leslie Brown, associate professor of history, recommends embracing conflict to affect change in the Daring Change session "What Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
  • 42:29

    Why I Love Impressionism, Carol Ockman, Professor of Art

    Why I Love Impressionism, Carol Ockman, Professor of Art

    Pretty pictures. Leisure. Everything we know about the modern world. What happens if we go beyond the popularity of paintings to explore their social history?
    Pretty pictures. Leisure. Everything we know about the modern world. What happens if we go beyond the popularity of paintings to explore their social history?
  • 15:41

    It's Not Easy Being Green (Yet)

    It's Not Easy Being Green (Yet)

    Jeannie Albrecht, assistant professor of computer science, explores the value of a liberal arts education and sustainability in the Daring Change session "What Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
    Jeannie Albrecht, assistant professor of computer science, explores the value of a liberal arts education and sustainability in the Daring Change session "What Will We Learn?" April 6, 2013
  • 49:14

    When Pretty Good is Good Enough

    When Pretty Good is Good Enough

    Brent Heeringa, associate professor of computer science, presented "When Pretty Good is Good Enough: A Tour of Approximation Algorithms" as part of the Williams College annual Faculty Lecture Series.
    Brent Heeringa, associate professor of computer science, presented "When Pretty Good is Good Enough: A Tour of Approximation Algorithms" as part of the Williams College annual Faculty Lecture Series.
  • 44:45

    Prof. Bill Wootters: "Why Does Nature Like the Square Root of Negative One?"

    Prof. Bill Wootters: "Why Does Nature Like the Square Root of Negative One?"

    William Wootters, Barclay Jermain Professor of Natural Philosophy at Williams College, presents "Why Does Nature Like the Square Root of Negative One?" as part of the 2013 Faculty Lecture Series.
    William Wootters, Barclay Jermain Professor of Natural Philosophy at Williams College, presents "Why Does Nature Like the Square Root of Negative One?" as part of the 2013 Faculty Lecture Series.
  • 3:13

    Drawing Beyond your Comfort Zone

    Drawing Beyond your Comfort Zone

    Michael Glier, Professor of Art, talks about studio art at Williams. His class, Drawing Bodies, is a studio art and art history course that is team-taught with art professor Carol Ockman. The course is intended to introduce both the experiential and conceptual dimensions of the body and to develop skills in critical thinking. With Tracy Hu '13, Mei Kazama '16, and Emmanuel Whyte '13.
    Michael Glier, Professor of Art, talks about studio art at Williams. His class, Drawing Bodies, is a studio art and art history course that is team-taught with art professor Carol Ockman. The course is intended to introduce both the experiential and conceptual dimensions of the body and to develop skills in critical thinking. With Tracy Hu '13, Mei Kazama '16, and Emmanuel Whyte '13.
  • 1:36

    Ken Kuttner

    Ken Kuttner

    Atish R. Ghosh, International Monetary Fund; James Hanson, formerly World Bank; Garry Schinasi, Independent Adviser, Global Financial Stability and formerly IMF. Chair: Ken Kuttner, Robert F. White Class of 1952 Professor of Economics at Williams College Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
    Atish R. Ghosh, International Monetary Fund; James Hanson, formerly World Bank; Garry Schinasi, Independent Adviser, Global Financial Stability and formerly IMF. Chair: Ken Kuttner, Robert F. White Class of 1952 Professor of Economics at Williams College Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
  • 1:47

    Peter Pedroni

    Peter Pedroni

    The Role of Research in the Bank and the Fund Peter Pedroni, Williams College Professor of Economics Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
    The Role of Research in the Bank and the Fund Peter Pedroni, Williams College Professor of Economics Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
  • 3:44

    Peter Montiel

    Peter Montiel

    The Role of a Lender of Last Resort Peter Montiel, Chair and Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. '41 Professor of Economics at Williams College Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
    The Role of a Lender of Last Resort Peter Montiel, Chair and Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. '41 Professor of Economics at Williams College Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
  • 5:15

    Jerry Caprio

    Jerry Caprio

    What Kind of World Bank in the 21st Century? Jerry Caprio '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
    What Kind of World Bank in the 21st Century? Jerry Caprio '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
  • 5:09

    Anand Swamy

    Anand Swamy

    Economics professor Anand Swamy introduces the keynote address Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
    Economics professor Anand Swamy introduces the keynote address Part of the Williams College Center for Development Economics conference "The Future of the World Bank and the IMF: Redesign for a New (and Old) World" held on campus at the '62 Center on Sept. 27-28, 2012
  • 8:55

    Prof. Christian Thorne's Introduction of Noam Chomsky

    Prof. Christian Thorne's Introduction of Noam Chomsky

    On September 15, 2011, Noam Chomsky shared remarks on the pitfalls of humanitarian intervention with the Williams College community. This is Associate Professor of English Christian Thorne's introduction of Prof. Chomsky. Prof. Chomsky's full remarks can be viewed at http://bit.ly/ommp1s
    On September 15, 2011, Noam Chomsky shared remarks on the pitfalls of humanitarian intervention with the Williams College community. This is Associate Professor of English Christian Thorne's introduction of Prof. Chomsky. Prof. Chomsky's full remarks can be viewed at http://bit.ly/ommp1s
  • 33:56

    He's Got No License, Nor No Deplomer: A Black Doctor and His Story After the Civil War

    He's Got No License, Nor No Deplomer: A Black Doctor and His Story After the Civil War

    Faculty lecture given on 2/10/11 by Gretchen Long, associate professor of history at Williams College.
    Faculty lecture given on 2/10/11 by Gretchen Long, associate professor of history at Williams College.
  • 39:48

    Gays in the French Military

    Gays in the French Military

    Brian Martin, associate professor of French and comparative literature, will present the fifth installment of the annual Faculty Lecture Series on Thursday, March 10, at Williams College. His talk, "Gays in the French Military: From Napoleon to the First World War," is at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow. Following the French Revolution, radical military reforms created conditions for new physical and emotional intimacy between soldiers, establishing a model of fraternal affection during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars that would persist amid the ravages of the Franco-Prussian War and World War I. Martin's lecture will highlight this dramatic history and contextualize this particular French military model with the American historical record of military sexuality from the Civil War to World War I and World War II, and the historic repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" in 2010. The lecture is centered on research Martin completed for his recent book, "Napoleonic Friendship: Military Fraternity, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century France," which was published in 2010. Based on extensive archival research in France, the book examines a broad range of emotional and erotic relationships, from combat buddies to soldier lovers. Among Martin's areas of interest are the nineteenth-century French novel, twentieth-century French fiction and film, Nordic literature, military history, and gender, sexuality, and queer studies. His work has been published in journals such as The Comparatist and the Journal of GLB Identity. Martin joined the Williams faculty in 2004 and teaches courses such as Sexuality and Seduction in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century France, Paris on Fire: Incendiary Voices from the City of Light, War and Resistance: Two Centuries of War Literature in France, and Desperate Housewives and Extreme Makeovers in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. Martin received his A.B. in French and English Literature from Harvard in 1993, his M.A. in Comparative Literature from UCLA in 1996, and his A.M. and Ph.D. from Harvard in 1999 and 2003. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    Brian Martin, associate professor of French and comparative literature, will present the fifth installment of the annual Faculty Lecture Series on Thursday, March 10, at Williams College. His talk, "Gays in the French Military: From Napoleon to the First World War," is at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow. Following the French Revolution, radical military reforms created conditions for new physical and emotional intimacy between soldiers, establishing a model of fraternal affection during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars that would persist amid the ravages of the Franco-Prussian War and World War I. Martin's lecture will highlight this dramatic history and contextualize this particular French military model with the American historical record of military sexuality from the Civil War to World War I and World War II, and the historic repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" in 2010. The lecture is centered on research Martin completed for his recent book, "Napoleonic Friendship: Military Fraternity, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century France," which was published in 2010. Based on extensive archival research in France, the book examines a broad range of emotional and erotic relationships, from combat buddies to soldier lovers. Among Martin's areas of interest are the nineteenth-century French novel, twentieth-century French fiction and film, Nordic literature, military history, and gender, sexuality, and queer studies. His work has been published in journals such as The Comparatist and the Journal of GLB Identity. Martin joined the Williams faculty in 2004 and teaches courses such as Sexuality and Seduction in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century France, Paris on Fire: Incendiary Voices from the City of Light, War and Resistance: Two Centuries of War Literature in France, and Desperate Housewives and Extreme Makeovers in the Nineteenth-Century Novel. Martin received his A.B. in French and English Literature from Harvard in 1993, his M.A. in Comparative Literature from UCLA in 1996, and his A.M. and Ph.D. from Harvard in 1999 and 2003. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 50:02

    Prof. Stephen Freund on "Stopping the Software Bug Epidemic"

    Prof. Stephen Freund on "Stopping the Software Bug Epidemic"

    In the third lecture of the annual Faculty Lecture Series on Thursday, Feb. 24, Stephen Freund, associate professor of computer science, will present "Stopping the Software Bug Epidemic" at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium on the Williams College campus. A reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public. Software bugs, mistakes made by engineers in a program's source code, plague every computer system. Sometimes the effects are trivial, but sometimes they are catastrophic. Given the increasingly pervasive role of computers in society, creating more reliable software systems is an important task. In his talk, Freund will examine how software is written and why it is so difficult to get right. He will then discuss how research on automatic program checkers may enable programmers to more quickly find and fix bugs. Freund will then describe a particular checker designed to catch concurrency bugs. Among Freund's research interests are the design and implementation of programming languages, race condition and atomicity checking, type-based program analysis, and verification of multithreaded programs. His work has been published in journals including Communications of the ACM, Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, and Theoretical Computer Science. Freund joined the Williams faculty in 2002, after working as a member of the research staff at Compaq Systems Research Center for two years. Freund teaches courses including Principles of Programming Languages, Data Structures and Advanced Programming, Introduction to Computer Science, and an advanced tutorial on Compiler Design. Freund earned his B.S. in computer science from Stanford in 1995 and his Ph.D. from Stanford in 2000. The next speaker in the Faculty Lecture Series will be Claire Ting, associate professor of biology, who will present a lecture titled "Minimal Genomes, Maximal Productivity: Microbial Strategies for Dominating the High Seas." Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    In the third lecture of the annual Faculty Lecture Series on Thursday, Feb. 24, Stephen Freund, associate professor of computer science, will present "Stopping the Software Bug Epidemic" at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium on the Williams College campus. A reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public. Software bugs, mistakes made by engineers in a program's source code, plague every computer system. Sometimes the effects are trivial, but sometimes they are catastrophic. Given the increasingly pervasive role of computers in society, creating more reliable software systems is an important task. In his talk, Freund will examine how software is written and why it is so difficult to get right. He will then discuss how research on automatic program checkers may enable programmers to more quickly find and fix bugs. Freund will then describe a particular checker designed to catch concurrency bugs. Among Freund's research interests are the design and implementation of programming languages, race condition and atomicity checking, type-based program analysis, and verification of multithreaded programs. His work has been published in journals including Communications of the ACM, Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, and Theoretical Computer Science. Freund joined the Williams faculty in 2002, after working as a member of the research staff at Compaq Systems Research Center for two years. Freund teaches courses including Principles of Programming Languages, Data Structures and Advanced Programming, Introduction to Computer Science, and an advanced tutorial on Compiler Design. Freund earned his B.S. in computer science from Stanford in 1995 and his Ph.D. from Stanford in 2000. The next speaker in the Faculty Lecture Series will be Claire Ting, associate professor of biology, who will present a lecture titled "Minimal Genomes, Maximal Productivity: Microbial Strategies for Dominating the High Seas." Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 43:04

    chris nugent 022111

    chris nugent 022111

    This year's Faculty Lecture Series will continue on Thursday, Feb. 17, with a lecture by Christopher Nugent, associate professor of Chinese at Williams College. Nugent's talk, titled "A Medieval Chinese Poem in Its Material Contexts," will take place at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow in Schow atrium. Nugent's talk examines the ways that the different material contexts in which a reader encounters a poem can influence issues of meaning and interpretation. He will also explore the idea that material contexts in various periods in medieval China reveal how literate audiences in those periods thought about and received poetry. Nugent joined the Williams College faculty in 2004 and teaches courses in modern and classical Chinese language, literature, and culture. Nugent was twice awarded the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching while pursuing his Ph.D. Nugent's first book was published in December. Titled "Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China," the work explores the composition and transmission of oral and written poetry in medieval China. His work has also been published in the journals Asia Major and T'oung Pao. In March he will become editor of the journal T'ang Studies. Among Nugent's other areas of expertise and interest are Tang Dynasty literary and manuscript culture, textual and oral circulation of poetry, second/foreign language pedagogy, and memory and memorization. Nugent received his B.A. in religious studies from Brown and his Ph.D. in East Asian languages and civilizations from Harvard in 2004. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    This year's Faculty Lecture Series will continue on Thursday, Feb. 17, with a lecture by Christopher Nugent, associate professor of Chinese at Williams College. Nugent's talk, titled "A Medieval Chinese Poem in Its Material Contexts," will take place at 4 p.m. in Wege Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow in Schow atrium. Nugent's talk examines the ways that the different material contexts in which a reader encounters a poem can influence issues of meaning and interpretation. He will also explore the idea that material contexts in various periods in medieval China reveal how literate audiences in those periods thought about and received poetry. Nugent joined the Williams College faculty in 2004 and teaches courses in modern and classical Chinese language, literature, and culture. Nugent was twice awarded the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching while pursuing his Ph.D. Nugent's first book was published in December. Titled "Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China," the work explores the composition and transmission of oral and written poetry in medieval China. His work has also been published in the journals Asia Major and T'oung Pao. In March he will become editor of the journal T'ang Studies. Among Nugent's other areas of expertise and interest are Tang Dynasty literary and manuscript culture, textual and oral circulation of poetry, second/foreign language pedagogy, and memory and memorization. Nugent received his B.A. in religious studies from Brown and his Ph.D. in East Asian languages and civilizations from Harvard in 2004. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 43:48

    OLGA SHEVCHENKO 032111

    OLGA SHEVCHENKO 032111

    On Thursday, March 17, Olga Shevchenko, associate professor of sociology at Williams College, will present the final lecture of the year's annual Faculty Lecture Series. Her talk, titled "Crisis as a Way of Life: Culture of the Everyday in Today's Russia," will take place in Wege Auditorium at 4 p.m. A reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public. The decade of the 1990s marked a period of rapid and widespread change for the citizens of the Soviet Union, during which political opportunities, professional hierarchies, and cultural mores were all in flux. How did these multiple large-scale transformations manifest themselves on the level of everyday life? In her talk, Shevchenko will draw on ethnographic observation and repeated interviews with a cross-section of Muscovites in the late 1990s to understand how people made sense of their post-Soviet experience. Through these conversations, Shevchenko will explore the ways in which an understanding of these profound changes can contribute to our understanding of Russian politics and culture today. Shevchenko's interests include visual sociology, social theory, sociology of culture, everyday life, and postsocialism. Her work has been published in Social Psychology Quarterly, Social Identities, and Journal of Consumer Culture, among other journals and books. In 2009, Shevchenko published a book titled Crisis and the Everyday in Postsocialist Moscow, which won both the Heldt Prize from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies and the Davis Center Book Prize in Political and Social Studies from the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Shevchenko joined the faculty in 2002. Her courses include Images and Society; Culture, Consumption, and Modernity; Memory and Identity; Communism and Its Aftermath; and Ways of Knowing. Shevchenko received her B.A. equivalent from Moscow State University in 1996 and her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    On Thursday, March 17, Olga Shevchenko, associate professor of sociology at Williams College, will present the final lecture of the year's annual Faculty Lecture Series. Her talk, titled "Crisis as a Way of Life: Culture of the Everyday in Today's Russia," will take place in Wege Auditorium at 4 p.m. A reception will follow the talk, which is free and open to the public. The decade of the 1990s marked a period of rapid and widespread change for the citizens of the Soviet Union, during which political opportunities, professional hierarchies, and cultural mores were all in flux. How did these multiple large-scale transformations manifest themselves on the level of everyday life? In her talk, Shevchenko will draw on ethnographic observation and repeated interviews with a cross-section of Muscovites in the late 1990s to understand how people made sense of their post-Soviet experience. Through these conversations, Shevchenko will explore the ways in which an understanding of these profound changes can contribute to our understanding of Russian politics and culture today. Shevchenko's interests include visual sociology, social theory, sociology of culture, everyday life, and postsocialism. Her work has been published in Social Psychology Quarterly, Social Identities, and Journal of Consumer Culture, among other journals and books. In 2009, Shevchenko published a book titled Crisis and the Everyday in Postsocialist Moscow, which won both the Heldt Prize from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies and the Davis Center Book Prize in Political and Social Studies from the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Shevchenko joined the faculty in 2002. Her courses include Images and Society; Culture, Consumption, and Modernity; Memory and Identity; Communism and Its Aftermath; and Ways of Knowing. Shevchenko received her B.A. equivalent from Moscow State University in 1996 and her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 47:04

    On Tarantino, Nazis, and Movies That Can Kill You

    On Tarantino, Nazis, and Movies That Can Kill You

    Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds" is one of most curious films of the last decade. It looks like a historical drama, but ends up rewriting history in ways no viewer could overlook: American Jews storm the Nazi high command and gun down Hitler and his cronies. Christian Thorne, professor of English at Williams College, examines some of the riddles that emerge from Tarantino's approach. Why would a filmmaker edit history so that the Americans get to win a war that they actually won anyway? Why, in 2009, make a 1970s-style B-movie about 1944? And what can we say about a movie which shows people watching a movie and then, as its final act, kills them all? Will we make it through such a movie alive? Christian Thorne writes regularly on topics ranging from zombie movies to eighteenth-century poetry to recent trends in Italian Marxism. His "Dialectic of Counter-Enlightenment" (2009) was awarded the Thomas Wilson Prize for best first book by Harvard University Press.
    Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds" is one of most curious films of the last decade. It looks like a historical drama, but ends up rewriting history in ways no viewer could overlook: American Jews storm the Nazi high command and gun down Hitler and his cronies. Christian Thorne, professor of English at Williams College, examines some of the riddles that emerge from Tarantino's approach. Why would a filmmaker edit history so that the Americans get to win a war that they actually won anyway? Why, in 2009, make a 1970s-style B-movie about 1944? And what can we say about a movie which shows people watching a movie and then, as its final act, kills them all? Will we make it through such a movie alive? Christian Thorne writes regularly on topics ranging from zombie movies to eighteenth-century poetry to recent trends in Italian Marxism. His "Dialectic of Counter-Enlightenment" (2009) was awarded the Thomas Wilson Prize for best first book by Harvard University Press.
  • 54:31

    Prof. Susan Engel: "How We Should Educate Today's Children"

    Prof. Susan Engel: "How We Should Educate Today's Children"

    "An Immodest Proposal: How We Should Educate Today's Children" Susan Engel, Director of Program in Teaching and Senior Lecturer in Psychology Susan Engel's research has focused on the emergence of narratives, children's autobiographical memory, imaginative processes in childhood, and the development of curiosity. Drawing on discoveries about human development made in the past 50 years, she will discuss what's wrong with schools in this country, and how we can change them so that our children can become thoughtful, industrious, inventive, and civically minded adults. Her work has appeared in chapters and articles for scientific publications, and she has also written for teachers and parents. She has published three books, and her fourth, Red Flags or Red Herrings, which is about predicting a child's future, will be published by Simon and Schuster in 2011. In 2007/8 she published a series of columns in the New York Times describing how teachers solve problems, and in 2009/10 she published two op-ed pieces in the New York Times, one on teacher education, the other on curriculum. She is the co-founder of an experimental school in New York State, where, for 14 years, she oversaw all aspects of educational practice, including developing curriculum and supervising the teachers. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    "An Immodest Proposal: How We Should Educate Today's Children" Susan Engel, Director of Program in Teaching and Senior Lecturer in Psychology Susan Engel's research has focused on the emergence of narratives, children's autobiographical memory, imaginative processes in childhood, and the development of curiosity. Drawing on discoveries about human development made in the past 50 years, she will discuss what's wrong with schools in this country, and how we can change them so that our children can become thoughtful, industrious, inventive, and civically minded adults. Her work has appeared in chapters and articles for scientific publications, and she has also written for teachers and parents. She has published three books, and her fourth, Red Flags or Red Herrings, which is about predicting a child's future, will be published by Simon and Schuster in 2011. In 2007/8 she published a series of columns in the New York Times describing how teachers solve problems, and in 2009/10 she published two op-ed pieces in the New York Times, one on teacher education, the other on curriculum. She is the co-founder of an experimental school in New York State, where, for 14 years, she oversaw all aspects of educational practice, including developing curriculum and supervising the teachers. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 56:03

    Real Instruments And The Sound We Hear

    Real Instruments And The Sound We Hear

    Real instruments and the sound we hear goes beyond the basic descriptions of tuning and timbre to explore the nuances of real musical sounds.
    Real instruments and the sound we hear goes beyond the basic descriptions of tuning and timbre to explore the nuances of real musical sounds.
  • 58:37

    Physics of Musical Instruments

    Physics of Musical Instruments

    Physics of Musical Instruments, introduces the physics of sound waves. We discuss the connection between musical pitch and frequency, and consider the core elements of instrument design that determine pitch.
    Physics of Musical Instruments, introduces the physics of sound waves. We discuss the connection between musical pitch and frequency, and consider the core elements of instrument design that determine pitch.
  • 24:23

    Immigration History and Citizenship

    Immigration History and Citizenship

    Immigration and Citizenship views the history of immigration to the United States as the history of American race relations through the concept of citizenship.
    Immigration and Citizenship views the history of immigration to the United States as the history of American race relations through the concept of citizenship.
  • 20:50

    Chinese Exclusion/Japanese Internment

    Chinese Exclusion/Japanese Internment

    "Chinese Exclusion/Japanese Internment" turns to the anti-Asian movement which began in the mid-19th century, resulting in the exclusion of most Chinese immigrants from 1882-1943, and culminating in the internment of 110,000 Japanese immigrations and Japanese Americans during WWII.
    "Chinese Exclusion/Japanese Internment" turns to the anti-Asian movement which began in the mid-19th century, resulting in the exclusion of most Chinese immigrants from 1882-1943, and culminating in the internment of 110,000 Japanese immigrations and Japanese Americans during WWII.
  • 1:6:05

    Detective Work: A Look Inside the NYPD

    Detective Work: A Look Inside the NYPD

    Author and Williams College Sociology Professor Robert Jackall examines the occupational consciousness of police detectives: the morally ambiguous intricacies of their craft, their self-images, and their rules-in-use, as they move between the streets and the bureaucracy to which they report. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    Author and Williams College Sociology Professor Robert Jackall examines the occupational consciousness of police detectives: the morally ambiguous intricacies of their craft, their self-images, and their rules-in-use, as they move between the streets and the bureaucracy to which they report. Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 51:32

    Politics, Economics & Power in Ancient Mayan Civilizations

    Politics, Economics & Power in Ancient Mayan Civilizations

    Excavations at Motul de San José, Guatemala. Reunion 2008 Lecture by Antonia Foias, Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology/Sociology, Williams College. http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    Excavations at Motul de San José, Guatemala. Reunion 2008 Lecture by Antonia Foias, Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology/Sociology, Williams College. http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 55:55

    Regime Change in Iraq: What Did We Mean?

    Regime Change in Iraq: What Did We Mean?

    Reunion 2008 lecture by Michael MacDonald, Frederick L. Schuman Professor of International Relations, Williams College. http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    Reunion 2008 lecture by Michael MacDonald, Frederick L. Schuman Professor of International Relations, Williams College. http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 40:25

    The U.S. Safety Net in Recession

    The U.S. Safety Net in Recession

    Williams College Alumni Reunion 2009 lecture by Cathy Johnson, Political Science, Williams College. How are changes to social welfare programs intended to encourage and reward paid employment faring in a time when unemployment is rising and jobs are disappearing? http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
    Williams College Alumni Reunion 2009 lecture by Cathy Johnson, Political Science, Williams College. How are changes to social welfare programs intended to encourage and reward paid employment faring in a time when unemployment is rising and jobs are disappearing? http://alumni.williams.edu Produced by Bill Matthiesen '70, Berkshire Film & Video, www.bfv.com
  • 47:41

    Reclaiming DaVinci: Art, Visualization, Mathematics

    Reclaiming DaVinci: Art, Visualization, Mathematics

    Williams College Math Prof. Satyan Devadoss looks at the tension between the visual arts and scientific research. 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
    Williams College Math Prof. Satyan Devadoss looks at the tension between the visual arts and scientific research. 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
  • 45:56

    What is Iraq? Defining the Nation

    What is Iraq? Defining the Nation

    Williams College History Professor Magnus Bernhardsson considers the future of the Iraqi nation. 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
    Williams College History Professor Magnus Bernhardsson considers the future of the Iraqi nation. 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
  • 57:17

    Materializing Metaphor in Medieval Art

    Materializing Metaphor in Medieval Art

    Williams College Art Professor Peter Low considers the question "What was the point of public religious art in churches in the Middle Ages?" in his talk "Materializing Metaphor: Bodies, Buildings, and Ephesians 2:11-22 in Medieval Art." 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
    Williams College Art Professor Peter Low considers the question "What was the point of public religious art in churches in the Middle Ages?" in his talk "Materializing Metaphor: Bodies, Buildings, and Ephesians 2:11-22 in Medieval Art." 2008 Faculty Lecture Series.
  • 19:02

    This is Not a Ghost Story: Rethinking Resurrection

    This is Not a Ghost Story: Rethinking Resurrection

    Denise Buell, professor of religion, presents "This is Not a Ghost Story: Rethinking Resurrection." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Denise Buell, professor of religion, presents "This is Not a Ghost Story: Rethinking Resurrection." Delivered July 16, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 19:57

    Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises

    Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises

    Gerard Caprio Jr. '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics at Williams, presents "Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises." Delivered June 9, 2012 as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Gerard Caprio Jr. '72, Chair of the Executive Committee for the Center of Development Economics and William Brough Professor of Economics at Williams, presents "Home Field Advantage: What Sports Teach Us About Limiting Financial Crises." Delivered June 9, 2012 as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 52:41

    Graphic Storytelling

    Graphic Storytelling

    "Everything I Know about Art and Culture I (Could Make a Case that) I Learned from the Comics": Graphic Storytelling in the Classroom. Peter T. Murphy, Dean of the Faculty, Professor of English. Williams College Reunion Weekend 2012
    "Everything I Know about Art and Culture I (Could Make a Case that) I Learned from the Comics": Graphic Storytelling in the Classroom. Peter T. Murphy, Dean of the Faculty, Professor of English. Williams College Reunion Weekend 2012
  • 18:27

    Mobilizing the Mural

    Mobilizing the Mural

    C. Ondine Chavoya, associate professor of art, presents "Mobilizing the Mural." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    C. Ondine Chavoya, associate professor of art, presents "Mobilizing the Mural." Delivered March 12, 2012, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 14:15

    Quarreling with Herman Rosse

    Quarreling with Herman Rosse

    Sandra Burton, Lipp Family Director of Dance and senior lecturer in dance at Williams College, presents "Quarreling with Herman Rosse." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Sandra Burton, Lipp Family Director of Dance and senior lecturer in dance at Williams College, presents "Quarreling with Herman Rosse." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 17:31

    Truth=Math=Beauty

    Truth=Math=Beauty

    Thomas Garrity, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, presents "Truth=Math=Beauty." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Thomas Garrity, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, presents "Truth=Math=Beauty." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
  • 16:24

    The Greatest Revolution

    The Greatest Revolution

    Williams College associate professor of history and Chair of International Student Program Magnus Bernhardsson presents, "The Greatest Revolution." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.
    Williams College associate professor of history and Chair of International Student Program Magnus Bernhardsson presents, "The Greatest Revolution." Delivered November 1, 2011, as part of the Williams Thinking lecture series.

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